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Blood Moon Tetrad – All the dates start to finish…right in front of our eyes!

17 Sep

I cannot believe I did not see this…literally again, staring me straight in the face every single day!  I knew the entire timeline was here, I was just looking too hard.  Every day I would say, “Lord, I know this is easy to see, I know it see.  You’ve placed it right in front of us, but I’m going the long way around!”  Well, today was EUREKA!

THERE IT IS, RIGHT THERE…DO YOU SEE IT?

First go to September 23, 2015 and subtract 49 weeks – that takes you to October 15, 2014, the 7th Day of Sukkots which fell on the Tishri 21.  Why is this important?  Because Sukkots is Pentecost for the Jews, just as ours is in the Spring and as we talked about, it’s the SHAVOUT and it was on Sunday, May 24th and it was the 50th day from April 5, the first day after Passover.  This is equal to 1 week in God’s count.  Okay, from there, you must notice that Tishri 21 as it stands out as the last day of Tabernacles, Sukkot so we must look back to see when it started…October 8 is the Eve with the the first day on October 9, the 15 of Tishri.  What I am saying is – the Jews count started in October 2014 – meaning their “49 days” but really “49 weeks” – making the 50th day or 50th week begin September 23/24, 2015.  This is the date of Daniel’s 70th Week only it is just a week but it will only be 6 days as He rests on the 7th which then brings you to September 28, 2015 as the end of His 70th Week.  It’s all right there in the picture above.

But see that Eclipse in the center, Adar 29, March 20 or 21st, that is going to represent the “Mid-Point” of the Week…which is September 21 (which now is also the 20th from the adding of Elul 30 to the calendar) making now Tuesday, September 22 now also September 21st, the first day of Spring and the first day of Fall.  These are your last days of repentance (10 Days of Awe) before the Day of Atonement on Wed/Thurs (September 23/24) on Tishri 10.  Adar 29 above represents September 29, which is now September 28 and Tishri 15/16…the last day of Sukkot in October 2014.  Adar 29 above also mirrors and represents Elul 29 which was September 13 but as we did above when counting 14 days from March 20 to April 4, Passover, we must do this here also; this leads us to September 26/27th, Tishri 13/14 and also Tishri 3/4 (Enoch) which mimics April 3/4 – Passover.

I don’t know how to record my desktop to explain this…but I don’t know how.  It’s just too much to type.  All I have to say is start with the picture above…start in the middle and work out both ways.  Go to Chad.org’s calendar and see what those days are.  Remember your markers – 69 weeks/70 weeks, 49 weeks, 50 weeks, 49 days/50 days when counting.  If you start at the right, the September 28 Blood Red Moon, you see the next one is April 4th…that is equal to Tishri 4 which now begins tonight and into tomorrow.  It then shows you March 20, which is to me, September 20, then go on to October 8, representing Tishri 8, which starts evening of September 21 into the day of September 22…then taking you back to April 15 which is September 28, Tishri 14/15, representing Passover, Nissan 15.

There it is…have at it!  This is God telling us exactly what is going on and when.  I’m too tired to do the leg-work on this one.  Time might be Fridays to Fridays, but starting on the Eve of it, Thursday, but it really doesn’t matter.  Maybe 2 weeks and 1 day to 4 days, may longer, maybe shorter…maybe 3 months (doubt it) but could be.  All I know is that one day after the Boston Bombing (it was April 15, 2013), was the big 7.8 Iran earthquake, it was on April 16 which represents yesterday, September 16.  This is a marker, a sign and pattern of things to come…maybe these will be a week apart which may constitute a day.  I don’t know, but the bombing doesn’t have to mean “man bombing”, it could be something explosive to the earth from God…just saying.  Again, take it or leave it but hopefully, you can study it and see these patterns.

Erev Sukkot (October 8, 2014 – Tishri 14)

It is customary to prepare the “four kinds” for use on Sukkot, binding the three hadassim (myrtle twigs) and two aravot (willow twigs) to the lulav (palm frond), in the sukkah on the afternoon preceding the festival.

Sukkot – 1st day (October 9, 2014 – Tishri 15)
Laws and Customs

The festival of Sukkot, commemorating G-d’s enveloping protection of the Children of Israel during their 40-year journey through the desert (1313-1273 BCE), is celebrated for seven days, beginning from the eve of Tishrei 15. During this time, we are commanded to “dwell” in a sukkah — a hut of temporary construction, with a roof covering of raw, unfinished vegetable matter (branches, reeds, bamboo, etc.) — signifying the temporality and fragily of human habitation and man-made shelter and our utter dependence upon G-d’s protection and providence. “How [does one fulfill] the mitzvah of dwelling in the sukkah? One should eat, drink, and live in the sukkah, both day and night, as one lives in one’s house on the other days of the year: for seven days a person should make his home his temporary dwelling, and his sukkah his permanent dwelling” (Code of Jewish Law, Orach Chaim 639:1).

At least one k’zayit (approx. 1 oz.) of bread should be eaten in the sukkah on the first evening of the festival, between nightfall and midnight. A special blessing,Leishiv BaSukkah, is recited. For the rest of the festival, all meals must be eaten in the sukkah (see the Code of Jewish Law or consult a Halachic authority as to what constitutes a “meal”). Chabad custom is to refrain from eating or drinking anything outside of the sukkah, even a glass of water.

Also see: the Ushpizin

Links:The Big Sukkah; The Temporary Dwelling; The Easy Mitzvah

According to Kabbalistic tradition, we are visited in the sukkah by seven supernalushpizin (“guests”) — Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Moses, Aaron, Joseph and David. On each of the seven days of the festival, another of the seven ushpizin (in the above order) leads the group.

(The sixth Lubavitcher Rebbe, Rabbi Yosef Yitzchak Schneersohn (1880-1950) spoke of seven “chassidic ushpizin” as well: the Baal Shem Tov, the Maggid (Rabbi DovBer of Mezeritch), and the first five rebbes of Chabad: Rabbi Schneur Zalmanof Liadi, Rabbi DovBer of Lubavitch, Rabbi Menachem Mendel (the “Tzemach Tzeddek”), Rabbi Shmuel, and Rabbi Sholom DovBer. The Lubavitcher Rebbe would speak each night of Sukkot on the special characteristics of both the biblical and the chassidic ushpizin of the day and their connection to each other and their specific day of the festival.)

Link:The Unpopular Tzaddik

“And you shall take for yourself on the first day,” instructs the Torah in Leviticus “the splendid fruit of a tree, fronds of dates, the branch of the thick-leafed tree and aravot of the river.” Torah SheBaal Peh (the oral tradition given to Moses at Sinai and handed through the generations, and later documented in the Mishnah and Talmud) identifies the four kinds as the etrog (citron), lulav (unopened palm branch), hadass (myrtle twig, of which three are taken) and aravah (willow, two twigs). The palm branch, three myrtle twigs and two willow twigs are bound together (with rings made from palm leaves).

Each day of Sukkot — except Shabbat — we take the lulav in hand, recite a blessing over it, take hold of the etrog, hold the “Four Kinds” together, and move them back and forth in all directions (right, left, forward, up, down and back). An additional blessing, shehecheyanu, is recited the first time that the Four Kinds are taken during the festival. We also hold the Four Kinds during the Hallel prayer (moving them as above in specified places in the text) and the Hoshaanot prayers (during which we march around the reading table in the synagogue) which are included in the daily service each day of Sukkot.

Link:The Four Mysteries of King Solomon

When the Holy Temple stood in Jerusalem, one of the special Sukkot observances was to pour water on the Altar. The drawing of water for this purpose was preceded by all-night celebrations in the Temple courtyard; on the 15 steps leading to the azarah (inner courtyard) stood Levites while playing a variety of musical instruments, sages danced and juggled burning torches, and huge oil-burning lamps illuminated the entire city. The singing and dancing went on until daybreak, when a procession would make its way to the Shiloach Spring which flowed in a valley below the Temple to “draw water with joy.” “One who did not see the joy of the water-drawing celebrations,” declared the sages of the Talmud, “has not seen joy in his life.”

While water was poured each day of the fetival, the special celebrations were held only on Chol Hamoed since many of the elements of the celebration (e.g., the playing of musical instruments) are forbidden on Yom Tov.

Today, we commemorate these joyous celebrations by holding Simchat Beit HaShoeivah (“joy of the water drawing”) events in the streets, with music and dancing. The Lubavitcher Rebbe initiated the custom of holding such celebrations on Shabbat and Yom Tov as well — without musical instruments of course. The fact that we cannot celebrate as we did in the Temple, said the Rebbe, means that we are free to celebrate the joy of Sukkot with singing and dancing every day of the festival.

Link:The Taste of WaterLinks

Links: A Sukkot Anthology; more Laws, Customs & Insights (from JewishNewYear.com)

Hoshana Rabbah (Chol Hamoed Sukkot) (October 15, 2014 – Tishri 21)
Laws and Customs

The seventh day of Sukkot is called “Hoshana Rabbah” and is considered the final day of the divine “judgment” in which the fate of the new year is determined. The Psalm L’David Hashem Ori, which has been added to our daily prayer since the 1st of Elul, is recited for the last time today. Other Hoshanah Rabbah observances include:

It is customary to remain awake on the night preceding Hoshanah Rabbah and study Torah. We recite the entire Book of Deuteronomy and the Book of Psalms. In some congregations it is a custom for the Gabbai (synagogue manager) to distribute apples (signifying a “sweet year”) to the congregants.

In addition to the Four Kinds taken every day of Sukkot, it is a “Rabbinical Mitzvah”, dating back to the times of the Prophets, to take an additional aravah, or willow, on the 7th day of Sukkot. In the Holy Temple, large, 18-foot willow branches were set around the altar. Today, when we take the Four Kinds and carry them around the reading table in the synagogue during the “Hoshaanot” prayers, we make seven circuits around the table (instead of the daily one), and recited a lengthier prayer. At the conclusion of the Hoshaanot we strike the ground five times with a bundle of five willows, symbolizing the “tempering of the five measures of harshness.”

Link:The Willow (on the deeper significance of the mitzvah of aravah).

A festive meal is eaten in the Sukkah. We dip the bread in honey (as we did in each festive meal since Rosh Hashanah) for the last time. Today is also the last occasion on which we recite the special blessing for eating in the sukkah, since the biblical commandment to dwell in the sukkah is only for seven days (though it is the practice of many communities — and such is the Chabad custom — that, outside of the Land of Israel, we eat in the sukkah also on the 8th day, Shemini Atzeret).

The festival of Sukkot, commemorating G-d’s enveloping protection of the Children of Israel during their 40-year journey through the desert (1313-1273 BCE), is celebrated for seven days, beginning from the eve of Tishrei 15. During this time, we are commanded to “dwell” in a sukkah — a hut of temporary construction, with a roof covering of raw, unfinished vegetable matter (branches, reeds, bamboo, etc.) — signifying the temporality and fragily of human habitation and man-made shelter and our utter dependence upon G-d’s protection and providence. “How [does one fulfill] the mitzvah of dwelling in the sukkah? One should eat, drink, and live in the sukkah, both day and night, as one lives in one’s house on the other days of the year: for seven days a person should make his home his temporary dwelling, and his sukkah his permanent dwelling” (Code of Jewish Law, Orach Chaim 639:1).

At least one k’zayit (approx. 1 oz.) of bread should be eaten in the sukkah on the first evening of the festival, between nightfall and midnight. A special blessing,Leishiv BaSukkah, is recited. For the rest of the festival, all meals must be eaten in the sukkah (see the Code of Jewish Law or consult a Halachic authority as to what constitutes a “meal”). Chabad custom is to refrain from eating or drinking anything outside of the sukkah, even a glass of water.

Also see: the Ushpizin

Links:The Big Sukkah; The Temporary Dwelling; The Easy Mitzvah

Today is the last day when we eat in the sukkah. Shortly before sunset, many have the custom to enjoy a last snack in the sukkah, thus “bidding the sukkah farewell” until the following year.

“And you shall take for yourself on the first day,” instructs the Torah in Leviticus “the splendid fruit of a tree, fronds of dates, the branch of the thick-leafed tree and aravot of the river.” Torah SheBaal Peh (the oral tradition given to Moses at Sinai and handed through the generations, and later documented in the Mishnah and Talmud) identifies the four kinds as the etrog (citron), lulav (unopened palm branch), hadass (myrtle twig, of which three are taken) and aravah (willow, two twigs). The palm branch, three myrtle twigs and two willow twigs are bound together (with rings made from palm leaves).

Each day of Sukkot — except Shabbat — we take the lulav in hand, recite a blessing over it, take hold of the etrog, hold the “Four Kinds” together, and move them back and forth in all directions (right, left, forward, up, down and back). An additional blessing, shehecheyanu, is recited the first time that the Four Kinds are taken during the festival. We also hold the Four Kinds during the Hallel prayer (moving them as above in specified places in the text) and the Hoshaanot prayers (during which we march around the reading table in the synagogue) which are included in the daily service each day of Sukkot.

Link:The Four Mysteries of King Solomon

When the Holy Temple stood in Jerusalem, one of the special Sukkot observances was to pour water on the Altar. The drawing of water for this purpose was preceded by all-night celebrations in the Temple courtyard; on the 15 steps leading to the azarah (inner courtyard) stood Levites while playing a variety of musical instruments, sages danced and juggled burning torches, and huge oil-burning lamps illuminated the entire city. The singing and dancing went on until daybreak, when a procession would make its way to the Shiloach Spring which flowed in a valley below the Temple to “draw water with joy.” “One who did not see the joy of the water-drawing celebrations,” declared the sages of the Talmud, “has not seen joy in his life.”

While water was poured each day of the fetival, the special celebrations were held only on Chol Hamoed since many of the elements of the celebration (e.g., the playing of musical instruments) are forbidden on Yom Tov.

Today, we commemorate these joyous celebrations by holding Simchat Beit HaShoeivah (“joy of the water drawing”) events in the streets, with music and dancing. The Lubavitcher Rebbe initiated the custom of holding such celebrations on Shabbat and Yom Tov as well — without musical instruments of course. The fact that we cannot celebrate as we did in the Temple, said the Rebbe, means that we are free to celebrate the joy of Sukkot with singing and dancing every day of the festival.

Link:The Taste of Water

The seven days of the festival of Sukkot consist of two days of “Yom Tov”, followed by five days of “Chol Hamoed” (“weekdays of the festival”; also called “the intermediate days”). In the Land of Israel, there is only one day of Yom Tov, followed by six days of Chol Hamoed.

On Yom Tov all creative work is forbidden as on Shabbat, except for the tasks involved in food preparation (e.g., lighting a fire from a pre-existing flame, cooking, carrying “from domain to domain”); on Chol Hamoed, work whose avoidance would result in “significant loss” is permitted. Otherwise, all the mitzvot and customs of Sukkot apply: eating in the sukkah, taking the “four kinds”, etc. The “Yaale V’yavo” prayer is included in all prayers and Grace After Meals. Hallel, Hoshaanot and Musaf are recited following the Shacharit (morning) prayers.

It is the Chabad custom not to put on tefillin during Chol Hamoed, as on Shabbat and the festivals.

This goes on and on and on…but in the end, they all come together.

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1 Comment

Posted by on September 17, 2015 in Uncategorized

 

One response to “Blood Moon Tetrad – All the dates start to finish…right in front of our eyes!

  1. Irene

    September 21, 2015 at 11:18 pm

    Amen.

     

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