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The Mighty Hand of God…Just What Does It Hold? Surprise – Surprise!

13 Sep

Okay friends, just ask me if I was looking for this?  I will tell you – ABSOLUTELY NOT!  How did I find all of this today?  Oh, I was wondering about the “Finger of God” – you know, the Finger that wrote the 10 Commandments.  I then went directly to, “How many bones are in one finger?  Which finger did all the writing?  Then realizing what I had just said and the completely divine inspiration there – I went directly to the medical/teaching websites that explained to me the entire “Bone Family”!  All day long I have been in awe of the Lord and His incredible GOODNESS!  Still, I’m wondering which of His Angels (His Fingers) was used to write those Divine Heavenly Tablets, His LAWS as there are 5 main bones in the hand that could have been the ONE.  For now though, this will have to do and I will finish Part 2 tomorrow.  Please read this entire post all the way through – it’s amazing what the Lord has shown as my fingers (no pun intended), were just typing what the was laying upon my Spirit and even when I read it back, I too am overwhelmed, continually thinking how much He has gifted us with this unbelievable blessing!

GOD’S WARRIOR ARMIES – THE OLD TESTAMENT AND THE NEW TESTAMENT…

THE HANDS AND THE FEET

Carpals

There are eight carpal bones in each wrist A. Scaphoid, B. Lunate, C. Triquetral, D. Pisiform, E. Trapezium, F. Trapezoid, G. Capitate, and H. Hamate.

Carpus is the anatomical assembly connecting the hand to forearm. This term derives its meaning from the Latincarpus and the Greekκαρπός (karpós), both meaning “wrist.” In human anatomy, the main role of the carpus is to facilitate effective positioning of the hand and powerful use of the extensors and flexors of the forearm, but the mobility of individual carpal bones increase the freedom of movements at the wrist.[1]

In tetrapods, the carpus is the sole cluster of bones in the wrist between the radius and ulna and the metacarpus. The bones of the carpus do not belong to individual fingers (or toes in quadrupeds), whereas those of the metacarpus do. The corresponding part of the foot is the tarsus. The carpal bones allow the wrist to move and rotate vertically.[1]

 Metacarpals – The metacarpals connect the carpal bones of the wrist with the phalanges (fingers).

meta-Look up meta- at Dictionary.comword-forming element meaning 1. “after, behind,” 2. “changed, altered,” 3. “higher, beyond;” from Greek meta (prep.) “in the midst of, in common with, by means of, in pursuit or quest of,” from PIE *me- “in the middle” (cognates: German mit, Gothic miþ, Old English mið “with, together with, among;” see mid). Notion of “changing places with” probably led to senses “change of place, order, or nature,” which was a principal meaning of the Greek word when used as a prefix (but also denoting “community, participation; in common with; pursuing”).

Third sense, “higher than, transcending, overarching, dealing with the most fundamental matters of,” is due to misinterpretation ofmetaphysics as “science of that which transcends the physical.” This has led to a prodigious erroneous extension in modern usage, withmeta- affixed to the names of other sciences and disciplines, especially in the academic jargon of literary criticism.metabolic (adj.)Look up metabolic at Dictionary.com1845 in biological sense, from German metabolisch (1839), from Greek metabolikos “changeable,” from metabole “a change, changing, a transition” (see metabolism). Used earlier in a general sense of “involving change” (1743). Related: Metabolically.metabolism (n.)Look up metabolism at Dictionary.comin physiology sense, 1878, from French métabolisme, from Greek metabole “a change,” from metaballein “to change,” from meta- “over” (seemeta-) + ballein “to throw” (see ballistics).metabolize (v.)Look up metabolize at Dictionary.com1887 (transitive), 1934 (intransitive), from Greek metabole “a change” (see metabolism) + -ize. Related: Metabolized; metabolizing.metacarpus (n.)Look up metacarpus at Dictionary.com1650s, Modern Latin, from Greek metakarpion, from meta- (see meta-) + karpos “wrist” (see carpus). Related: Metacarpal.metacommunication (n.)Look up metacommunication at Dictionary.com1951, from meta- + communication.metal (n.)Look up metal at Dictionary.commid-13c., from Old French metal “metal; material, substance, stuff” (12c.), from Latin metallum “metal; mine, quarry, mineral, what is got by mining,” from Greek metallon “metal, ore” (senses only in post-classical texts; originally “mine, quarry, pit”), probably from metalleuein “to mine, to quarry,” of unknown origin, but related somehow to metallan “to seek after.” Compare Greek metalleutes “a miner,” metalleia “a searching for metals, mining.”metal (adj.)Look up metal at Dictionary.comlate 14c., from metal (n.).metallic (adj.)Look up metallic at Dictionary.com1560s, from Middle French métallique or directly from Latin metallicus, from Greek metallikos, from metallon (see metal).metallurgy (n.)Look up metallurgy at Dictionary.com1704, from Modern Latin metallurgia, from Greek metallourgos “worker in metal,” from metallon “metal” (see metal) + ergon “work” (seeorgan). Related: Metallurgical; metallurgist.metamathematics (n.)Look up metamathematics at Dictionary.com1890, from meta- + mathematics.metamorphic (adj.)Look up metamorphic at Dictionary.com1833 (Lyell) in the geological sense, in reference to rock whose form has been changed by heat or pressure, from metamorphosis + -ic. Earlier (1816) in non-technical sense “characterized by change.”metamorphism (n.)Look up metamorphism at Dictionary.com1837, from metamorphic + -ism.metamorphize (v.)Look up metamorphize at Dictionary.com“metamorphose,” 1590s, from Greek meta (see meta-) + morphe (see Morpheus) + -ize. Related: Metamorphized; metamorphizing. Alternative verbal form metamorphosize attested from 1841.metamorphose (v.)Look up metamorphose at Dictionary.com1570s, from Middle French métamorphoser (16c.), from métamorphose (n.), from Latin metamorphosis (see metamorphosis). Related:Metamorphosed. The Greek verb was metamorphoun.metamorphosis (n.)Look up metamorphosis at Dictionary.com1530s, “change of form or shape,” especially by witchcraft, from Latin metamorphosis, from Greek metamorphosis “a transforming, a transformation,” from metamorphoun “to transform, to be transfigured,” from meta- “change” (see meta-) + morphe “form” (seeMorpheus). Biological sense is from 1660s. As the title of Ovid’s work, late 14c., Metamorphoseos, from Latin Metamorphoses (plural).metanalysis (n.)Look up metanalysis at Dictionary.com1914, from meta- + analysis. Coined by Danish philologist Otto Jespersen (1860-1943).metanoia (n.)Look up metanoia at Dictionary.com1768, “penitence, spiritual conversion,” from Greek metanoia “afterthought, repentance,” from metanoein “to change one’s mind or purpose,” from meta- (see meta) + noein “to have mental perception,” from noos “mind, thought.”metaphor (n.)Look up metaphor at Dictionary.comlate 15c., from Middle French metaphore (Old French metafore, 13c.), and directly from Latin metaphora, from Greek metaphora “a transfer,” especially of the sense of one word to a different word, literally “a carrying over,” from metapherein “transfer, carry over; change, alter; to use a word in a strange sense,” from meta- “over, across” (see meta-) + pherein “to carry, bear” (see infer).metaphoric (adj.)Look up metaphoric at Dictionary.com1590s, from metaphor + -ic. Greek metaphorikos meant “apt at metaphors.”metaphorical (adj.)Look up metaphorical at Dictionary.com1550s, from metaphor + -ical. Related: metaphorically.metaphrastic (adj.)Look up metaphrastic at Dictionary.com1778, from Greek metaphrastikos “paraphrastic,” from metaphrasis “paraphrase,” from metaphrazein “to paraphrase, translate,” from meta-(see meta-) + phrazein “to show, tell” (see phrase (n.)). Related: metaphrastically (1570s).metaphysic (n.)Look up metaphysic at Dictionary.comlate 14c., from Medieval Latin metaphysica (see metaphysics). The usual form of metaphysics until 16c.; somewhat revived 19c. under German influence.metaphysical (adj.)Look up metaphysical at Dictionary.comearly 15c., “pertaining to metaphysics,” from methaphesik (late 14c.) + -al, and in part from Medieval Latin metaphysicalis, from Medieval Latin metaphysica (see metaphysics). It came to be used in the sense of “abstract, speculative” (among others by Johnson, who applied it to certain 17c. poets, notably Donne and Cowley, who used “witty conceits” and abstruse imagery). Related: Metaphysically.metaphysician (n.)Look up metaphysician at Dictionary.com1590s, from Middle French métaphysicien (14c.); see metaphysics + -ian.metaphysics (n.)Look up metaphysics at Dictionary.com1560s, plural of Middle English metaphisik, methaphesik (late 14c.), “branch of speculation which deals with the first causes of things,” from Medieval Latin metaphysica, neuter plural of Medieval Greek (ta) metaphysika, from Greek ta meta ta physika “the (works) after the Physics,” title of the 13 treatises which traditionally were arranged after those on physics and natural sciences in Aristotle’s writings. The name was given c.70 B.C.E. by Andronicus of Rhodes, and was a reference to the customary ordering of the books, but it was misinterpreted by Latin writers as meaning “the science of what is beyond the physical.” See meta- + physics. The word originally was used in English in the singular; plural form predominated after 17c., but singular made a comeback late 19c. in certain usages under German influence.metapolitics (n.)Look up metapolitics at Dictionary.com1784, “abstract political science;” see meta- + politics. Related: metapolitical, attested from 1670s in sense “outside the realm of politics.”metastasis (n.)Look up metastasis at Dictionary.com1570s, originally in rhetoric, from Late Latin metastasis “transition,” from Greek metastasis “a removing, removal; migration; a changing; change, revolution,” from methistanai “to remove, change,” from meta- “over, across” (see meta-) + histanai “to place, cause to stand,” from PIE root *sta- “to stand” (see stet). A rhetorical term in Late Latin for “a sudden transition in subjects,” medical use for “shift of disease from one part of the body to another” dates from 1660s in English. Related: Metastatic.metastasise (v.)Look up metastasise at Dictionary.comchiefly British English spelling of metastasize. Related: Metastasised; metastasising.metastasizeLook up metastasize at Dictionary.com1826, from metastasis + -ize. Related: Metastasized; metastasizing.metatarsal (adj.)Look up metatarsal at Dictionary.com1739, from metatarsus (1670s), from Modern Latin metatarsus, from meta- (see meta-) + tarsus (see tarsus). As a noun from 1854.metathesis (n.)Look up metathesis at Dictionary.com1570s, “transposition of letters in a word;” c. 1600, “rhetorical transposition of words,” from Late Latin metathesis, from Greek metathesis“change of position, transposition, change of opinion,” from stem of metatithenai “to transpose,” from meta- “to change” (see meta-) +tithenai “to place, set” (see theme). Plural is metatheses. Related: Metathetic.metathesize (v.)Look up metathesize at Dictionary.com1893, from metathesis + -ize. Related: Metathesized; metathesizing.mete (v.)Look up mete at Dictionary.com“to allot,” Old English metan “to measure, mete out; compare, estimate” (class V strong verb; past tense mæt, past participle meten), from Proto-Germanic *metan (cognates: Old Saxon metan, Old Frisian, Old Norse meta, Dutch meten, Old High German mezzan, German messen, Gothic mitan “to measure”), from PIE *med- “to take appropriate measures” (see medical). Used now only with out. Related: Meted; meting.mete (n.)Look up mete at Dictionary.com“boundary,” now only in phrase metes and bounds, late 15c., from Old French mete “limit, bounds, frontier,” from Latin meta “goal, boundary, post, pillar.”metempsychosis (n.)Look up metempsychosis at Dictionary.com1580s, “passing of the soul at death into another body,” from Late Latin metempsychosis, from Greek metempsychosis, from meta “change” (see meta-) + empsykhoun “to put a soul into,” from en “in” + psyche “soul” (see psyche). Pythagorean word for transmigration of souls at death. Related: Metempsychose (v.), 1590s.meteor (n.)Look up meteor at Dictionary.comlate 15c., “any atmospheric phenomenon,” from Middle French meteore (13c.) and directly from Medieval Latin meteorum (nominativemeteora), from Greek ta meteora “the celestial phenomena, things in heaven above,” plural of meteoron, literally “thing high up,” noun use of neuter of meteoros (adj.) “high up, raised from the ground, hanging,” from meta- “over, beyond” (see meta-) + -aoros “lifted, hovering in air,” related to aeirein “to raise” (see aorta).

Specific sense of “fireball, shooting star” is attested from 1590s. Atmospheric phenomena were formerly classified as aerial meteors (wind),aqueous meteors (rain, snow, hail), luminous meteors (aurora, rainbows), and igneous meteors (lightning, shooting stars).meteoric (adj.)Look up meteoric at Dictionary.com1812, “pertaining to meteors;” earlier “dependent on atmospheric conditions” (1789), from meteor + -ic. Figurative sense of “transiently brilliant” is from 1836.meteorite (n.)Look up meteorite at Dictionary.com“rock that falls to earth, after streaking across the sky as a meteor,” 1818, from meteor + -ite.meteoroid (n.)Look up meteoroid at Dictionary.com“rock floating in space, which becomes a meteor when it enters Earth’s atmosphere,” formed in English, 1865, from meteor + -oid.meteorological (adj.)Look up meteorological at Dictionary.com1560s, from Middle French météorologique or Greek meteorologikos; see meteorology + -ical. Related: Meteorologically.meteorologist (n.)Look up meteorologist at Dictionary.com1620s, from meteorology + -ist. Earlier was meteorologician (1570s). Greek meteorologos meant “one who deals with celestial phenomena, astronomer.”meteorology (n.)Look up meteorology at Dictionary.com“science of the atmosphere, weather forecasting,” 1610s, from French météorologie and directly from Greek meteorologia “treatise on celestial phenomena, discussion of high things,” from meteoron, literally “thing high up” (see meteor), + -logia “treatment of” (see -logy).meter (n.1)Look up meter at Dictionary.comalso metre, “poetic measure,” Old English meter “meter, versification,” from Latin metrum, from Greek metron “meter, a verse; that by which anything is measured; measure, length, size, limit, proportion,” from PIE root *me- (2) “to measure” (see meter (n.2)). Possibly reborrowed early 14c. (after a 300-year gap in recorded use) from Old French metre, with specific sense of “metrical scheme in verse,” from Latin metrum.meter (n.2)Look up meter at Dictionary.comalso metre, unit of length, 1797, from French mètre (18c.), from Greek metron “measure,” from PIE root *me- (2) “to measure” (cognates: Greek metra “lot, portion,” Sanskrit mati “measures,” matra “measure,” Avestan, Old Persian ma-, Latin metri “to measure”). Developed by French Academy of Sciences for system of weights and measures based on a decimal system originated 1670 by French clergyman Gabriel Mouton. Originally intended to be one ten-millionth of the length of a quadrant of the meridian.meter (n.3)Look up meter at Dictionary.com“device for measuring,” abstracted 1832 from gas-meter, etc., from French -mètre, used in combinations (in English from 1790), from Latinmetrum “measure” or cognate Greek metron “measure” (see meter (n.2)). Influenced by English meter “person who measures” (late 14c., agent noun from mete (v.)). As short for parking meter from 1960. Meter maid first recorded 1957; meter reader 1963.meter (v.)Look up meter at Dictionary.com“to measure by means of a meter,” 1884, from meter (n.3). Meaning “install parking meters” is from 1957.meth (n.)Look up meth at Dictionary.comcolloquial abbreviation of methedrine, attested from 1967.methadone (n.)Look up methadone at Dictionary.com1947, generic designation for 6-dimethylamino-4, 4-diphenyl-3-heptanone. For origins of the syllables, see methyl + amino + di- + -one.methamphetamine (n.)Look up methamphetamine at Dictionary.com1949, from methyl + amphetamine; so called because it was a methyl derivative of amphetamine.

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phalanx (n.)Look up phalanx at Dictionary.com1550s, “line of battle in close ranks,” from Latin phalanx “compact body of heavily armed men in battle array,” or directly from Greek phalanx(genitive phalangos) “line of battle, battle array,” also “finger or toe bone,” originally “round piece of wood, trunk, log,” of unknown origin. Perhaps from PIE root *bhelg- “plank, beam” (source of Old English balca “balk;” see balk (n.)). The Macedonian phalanx consisted of 50 close files of 16 men each. In anatomy, originally the whole row of finger joints, which fit together like infantry in close order. Figurative sense of “number of persons banded together in a common cause” is attested from 1600 (compare Spanish Falangist, member of a fascist organization founded in 1933).

Phalanges

Fingers are made up of proximal, intermediate and distal phalanges. The thumb lacks an intermediate phalange.

The phalanges consist of three sections , the proximal phalanges, the intermediate phalanges, and the distal phalanges. Collectively, these bones make up the structure known as the fingers. All of these bones play an important role in hand motion and function. The proximal phalanges are found at the base of the fingers, closest to the carpus. These bones are longer than the carpal bones. There are five proximal phalanges per hand. The intermediate phalanges are found in between the proximal phalanges and the distal phalanges. There are four intermediate phalanges found on each hand because the thumb lacks an intermediate phalange. The distal phalanges are a series of bones found at the tip of the hand, following the intermediate phalanges. There are five distal phalanges per hand.

noun, plural phalanxes or for 7, phalanges

[fuhlan-jeez] (Show IPA)

1.

(in ancient Greece) a group of heavily armed infantry formed in ranksand files close and deep, with shields joined and long spearsoverlapping.
2.

any body of troops in close array.
3.

a number of individuals, especially persons united for a commonpurpose.
4.

a compact or closely massed body of persons, animals, or things.
5.

Military, (initial capital letter) a radar-controlled U.S. Navy 20mmGatling-type gun deployed on ships as a last line of defense againstantiship cruise missiles.
6.

(in Fourierism) a group of about 1800 persons, living together andholding their property in common.
7.

Anatomy, Zoology. any of the bones of the fingers or toes.

Please click here to see incredible reference

Source: Boundless. “Carpals, Metacarpals, and Phalanges (The Hand).” Boundless Anatomy and Physiology. Boundless, 21 Jul. 2015. Retrieved 12 Sep. 2015 from https://www.boundless.com/physiology/textbooks/boundless-anatomy-and-physiology-textbook/the-skeletal-system-7/the-upper-limb-86/carpals-metacarpals-and-phalanges-the-hand-488-3143/

Source: Boundless. “Carpals, Metacarpals, and Phalanges (The Hand).” Boundless Anatomy and Physiology. Boundless, 21 Jul. 2015. Retrieved 12 Sep. 2015 from https://www.boundless.com/physiology/textbooks/boundless-anatomy-and-physiology-textbook/the-skeletal-system-7/the-upper-limb-86/carpals-metacarpals-and-phalanges-the-hand-488-3143/

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WORDNET DICTIONARY

Noun carpal tunnel syndrome has 1 sense

    • carpal tunnel syndrome(n = noun.state) – a painful disorder caused by compression of a nerve in the carpal tunnel; characterized by discomfort and weakness in the hands and fingers and by sensations of tingling, burning or numbness; is a kind of nerve entrapment.

nerve (n.)Look up nerve at Dictionary.comlate 14c., nerf “sinew, tendon,” from Old French nerf and directly from Medieval Latin nervus “nerve,” from Latin nervus “sinew, tendon; cord, bowstring,” metathesis of pre-Latin *neuros, from PIE *(s)neu- “tendon, sinew” (cognates: Sanskrit snavan- “band, sinew,” Armenian neard “sinew,” Greek neuron “sinew, tendon,” in Galen “nerve”). Sense of “fibers that convey impulses between the brain and the body” is from c. 1600.

Secondary senses developed from meaning “strength, vigor, energy” (c. 1600), from the “sinew” sense. Hence figurative sense of “feeling, courage,” first attested c. 1600; that of “courage, boldness” is from 1809; bad sense “impudence, cheek” is from 1887. Latin nervus also had a figurative sense of “vigor, force, power, strength,” as did Greek neuron. From the neurological sense come Nerves “condition of nervousness,” attested from 1792; to get on someone’s nerves, from 1895. War of nerves “psychological warfare” is from 1915.nerve (v.)Look up nerve at Dictionary.comc. 1500, “to ornament with threads;” see nerve (n.). Meaning “to give strength or vigor” is from 1749. Related: Nerved; nerving.

Carpal tunnel syndrome attested by 1970, from carpal tunnel, the tunnel-like passage that carries nerves through the wrist.

THIS IS GOD’S ARMY…

THIS IS GOD’S ARMY…

THIS IS WHY HIS HANDS AND FEET WERE “NAILED” TO THE CROSS…

BUT…

THEY WERE NAILED WITH “4 BRASS” STAKES…ISN’T THERE 4 ANGELS HOLDING BACK THE RIVER EUPHRATES?  WAS SOMETHING “NAILED TO THE CROSS” BY THE 4 BRASS NAILS THE SAME TIME JESUS WAS VIA JESUS HIMSELF?

WHY DO SOME SAY THE BRASS NAILS/STAKES WENT THROUGH THE CENTER OF HIS HAND – WHILE OTHERS SAY IT WAS AT THE WRIST?

DID YOU KNOW THAT THE BONES CONNECTING THE HAND AND THE WRIST THERE IS ONE CALLED “THE HEAD”?  DID HIS ARMY RECEIVE A HEAD WOUND AT THE TIME HE WAS CRUCIFIED ON THE CROSS?  OR, WAS IT IN THE CENTER OF HIS PALM?

Just for the fun of it, let me AGAIN paste the same reference I noted above about just one group of these hand bones:

noun, plural phalanxes or for 7, phalanges

[fuhlan-jeez] (Show IPA)

1.

(in ancient Greece) a group of heavily armed infantry formed in rank sand files close and deep, with shields joined and long spears overlapping.
2.

any body of troops in close array.
3.

a number of individuals, especially persons united for a common purpose.
4.

a compact or closely massed body of persons, animals, or things.
5.

Military, (initial capital letter) a radar-controlled U.S. Navy 20mm Gatling-type gun deployed on ships as a last line of defense against anti-ship cruise missiles.
6.

(in Fourierism) a group of about 1800 persons, living together and holding their property in common.
7.

Anatomy, Zoology. any of the bones of the fingers or toes.
lu·nateˈlo͞onāt/
adjective
  1. crescent-shaped.noun ANATOMY
    1.a crescent-shaped carpal bone situated in the center of the wrist and articulating with the radius.
    1.  Word Origin

    Also, lunated. being in the shape of crescent; crescent-shaped.
    noun
    2.

    Anatomy. the second bone from the thumb side of the proximal row of bones of the carpus.
    3.

    a crescent-shaped, microlithic artifact mounted in a haft to form acomposite tool, mostly Mesolithic in origin.       Origin of lunate

The lunate is one of these eight carpal bones. These carpals are arranged in two rows, and the lunate is located in the row closest to the radius and ulna. The lunate touches four other carpal bones, which are the scaphoid, the capitate, the hamate and the triquetral bones.

scaphoid

/ˈskæfɔɪd/
adjective

1.

(anatomy) an obsolete word for navicular
Word Origin
C18: via New Latin from Greek skaphoeidēs, from skaphē boat
Word Origin and History for scaphoid adj.

1741, from Modern Latin scaphoides “boat-shaped,” from Greekskaphoeides, with -oeides (see-oid ) + skaphe “light boat, skiff;” also“basin, trough, a bowl;” literally “thing dug or cut out,” from PIE *skabh-,from root *(s)kep- “to cut” (see scabies ). Related: Scaphoidal (1680s).

capitate

/ˈkæpɪˌteɪt/
adjective

1.

(botany) shaped like a head, as certain flowers or inflorescences
2.

(zoology) having an enlarged headlike end: a capitate bone
Word Origin
C17: from Latin capitātus having a (large) head, from caput head
adjective
1.

Botany. forming or shaped like a head or dense cluster.
2.

Biology. having an enlarged or swollen, headlike termination.
Origin of capitate
OKAY JUST WAIT A MINUTE…WHAT DID “CAPITATE” MEAN AGAIN?  WHERE IS THAT ON THE HAND AGAIN?  OKAY, ONE MORE TIME I’LL SHOW YOU WHERE THE “HEAD” IS:
OH YES, THERE YOU ARE…AT THE WRIST AREA WHERE THE BRASS STAKE WOULD HAVE BEEN HAMMERED – STRAIGHT THROUGH THE “HEAD”!  WHAT, THE CAPITATE BONE IS RIGHT ABOVE THE LUNATE BONE –  THE “CRESCENT” SHAPED BONE?  AND, IT’S ABOVE THE SCAPHOID BONE – THE “BOAT” OR “NAVICULAR” BONE, REALLY?  REALLY?
WAIT – WHAT ABOUT THE CENTER OF THE PALM?  THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN THE 3rd METACARPAL BONE!  REALLY?  OH, WHAT WAS THAT AGAIN?

meta-Look up meta- at Dictionary.comword-forming element meaning 1. “after, behind,” 2. “changed, altered,” 3. “higher, beyond;” from Greek meta (prep.) “in the midst of, in common with, by means of, in pursuit or quest of,” from PIE *me- “in the middle” (cognates: German mit, Gothic miþ, Old English mið “with, together with, among;” see mid). Notion of “changing places with” probably led to senses “change of place, order, or nature,” which was a principal meaning of the Greek word when used as a prefix (but also denoting “community, participation; in common with; pursuing”).

Third sense, “higher than, transcending, overarching, dealing with the most fundamental matters of,” is due to misinterpretation of metaphysics as “science of that which transcends the physical.” This has led to a prodigious erroneous extension in modern usage, withmeta- affixed to the names of other sciences and disciplines, especially in the academic jargon of literary criticism.metabolic (adj.)Look up metabolic at Dictionary.com1845 in biological sense, from German metabolisch (1839), from Greek metabolikos “changeable,” from metabole “a change, changing, a transition” (see metabolism). Used earlier in a general sense of “involving change” (1743). Related: Metabolically.metabolism (n.)Look up metabolism at Dictionary.comin physiology sense, 1878, from French métabolisme, from Greek metabole “a change,” from metaballein “to change,” from meta- “over” (seemeta-) + ballein “to throw” (see ballistics).metabolize (v.)Look up metabolize at Dictionary.com1887 (transitive), 1934 (intransitive), from Greek metabole “a change” (see metabolism) + -ize. Related: Metabolized; metabolizing.metacarpus (n.)Look up metacarpus at Dictionary.com1650s, Modern Latin, from Greek metakarpion, from meta- (see meta-) + karpos “wrist” (see carpus). Related: Metacarpal.metacommunication (n.)Look up metacommunication at Dictionary.com1951, from meta- + communication.metal (n.)Look up metal at Dictionary.commid-13c., from Old French metal “metal; material, substance, stuff” (12c.), from Latin metallum “metal; mine, quarry, mineral, what is got by mining,” from Greek metallon “metal, ore” (senses only in post-classical texts; originally “mine, quarry, pit”), probably from metalleuein “to mine, to quarry,” of unknown origin, but related somehow to metallan “to seek after.” Compare Greek metalleutes “a miner,” metalleia “a searching for metals, mining.”metal (adj.)Look up metal at Dictionary.comlate 14c., from metal (n.).metallic (adj.)Look up metallic at Dictionary.com1560s, from Middle French métallique or directly from Latin metallicus, from Greek metallikos, from metallon (see metal).metallurgy (n.)Look up metallurgy at Dictionary.com1704, from Modern Latin metallurgia, from Greek metallourgos “worker in metal,” from metallon “metal” (see metal) + ergon “work” (seeorgan). Related: Metallurgical; metallurgist.metamathematics (n.)Look up metamathematics at Dictionary.com1890, from meta- + mathematics.metamorphic (adj.)Look up metamorphic at Dictionary.com1833 (Lyell) in the geological sense, in reference to rock whose form has been changed by heat or pressure, from metamorphosis + -ic. Earlier (1816) in non-technical sense “characterized by change.”metamorphism (n.)Look up metamorphism at Dictionary.com1837, from metamorphic + -ism.metamorphize (v.)Look up metamorphize at Dictionary.com“metamorphose,” 1590s, from Greek meta (see meta-) + morphe (see Morpheus) + -ize. Related: Metamorphized; metamorphizing. Alternative verbal form metamorphosize attested from 1841.metamorphose (v.)Look up metamorphose at Dictionary.com1570s, from Middle French métamorphoser (16c.), from métamorphose (n.), from Latin metamorphosis (see metamorphosis). Related:Metamorphosed. The Greek verb was metamorphoun.metamorphosis (n.)Look up metamorphosis at Dictionary.com1530s, “change of form or shape,” especially by witchcraft, from Latin metamorphosis, from Greek metamorphosis “a transforming, a transformation,” from metamorphoun “to transform, to be transfigured,” from meta- “change” (see meta-) + morphe “form” (seeMorpheus). Biological sense is from 1660s. As the title of Ovid’s work, late 14c., Metamorphoseos, from Latin Metamorphoses (plural).metanalysis (n.)Look up metanalysis at Dictionary.com1914, from meta- + analysis. Coined by Danish philologist Otto Jespersen (1860-1943).metanoia (n.)Look up metanoia at Dictionary.com1768, “penitence, spiritual conversion,” from Greek metanoia “afterthought, repentance,” from metanoein “to change one’s mind or purpose,” from meta- (see meta) + noein “to have mental perception,” from noos “mind, thought.”metaphor (n.)Look up metaphor at Dictionary.comlate 15c., from Middle French metaphore (Old French metafore, 13c.), and directly from Latin metaphora, from Greek metaphora “a transfer,” especially of the sense of one word to a different word, literally “a carrying over,” from metapherein “transfer, carry over; change, alter; to use a word in a strange sense,” from meta- “over, across” (see meta-) + pherein “to carry, bear” (see infer).metaphoric (adj.)Look up metaphoric at Dictionary.com1590s, from metaphor + -ic. Greek metaphorikos meant “apt at metaphors.”metaphorical (adj.)Look up metaphorical at Dictionary.com1550s, from metaphor + -ical. Related: metaphorically.metaphrastic (adj.)Look up metaphrastic at Dictionary.com1778, from Greek metaphrastikos “paraphrastic,” from metaphrasis “paraphrase,” from metaphrazein “to paraphrase, translate,” from meta-(see meta-) + phrazein “to show, tell” (see phrase (n.)). Related: metaphrastically (1570s).metaphysic (n.)Look up metaphysic at Dictionary.comlate 14c., from Medieval Latin metaphysica (see metaphysics). The usual form of metaphysics until 16c.; somewhat revived 19c. under German influence.metaphysical (adj.)Look up metaphysical at Dictionary.comearly 15c., “pertaining to metaphysics,” from methaphesik (late 14c.) + -al, and in part from Medieval Latin metaphysicalis, from Medieval Latin metaphysica (see metaphysics). It came to be used in the sense of “abstract, speculative” (among others by Johnson, who applied it to certain 17c. poets, notably Donne and Cowley, who used “witty conceits” and abstruse imagery). Related: Metaphysically.metaphysician (n.)Look up metaphysician at Dictionary.com1590s, from Middle French métaphysicien (14c.); see metaphysics + -ian.metaphysics (n.)Look up metaphysics at Dictionary.com1560s, plural of Middle English metaphisik, methaphesik (late 14c.), “branch of speculation which deals with the first causes of things,” from Medieval Latin metaphysica, neuter plural of Medieval Greek (ta) metaphysika, from Greek ta meta ta physika “the (works) after the Physics,” title of the 13 treatises which traditionally were arranged after those on physics and natural sciences in Aristotle’s writings. The name was given c.70 B.C.E. by Andronicus of Rhodes, and was a reference to the customary ordering of the books, but it was misinterpreted by Latin writers as meaning “the science of what is beyond the physical.” See meta- + physics. The word originally was used in English in the singular; plural form predominated after 17c., but singular made a comeback late 19c. in certain usages under German influence.metapolitics (n.)Look up metapolitics at Dictionary.com1784, “abstract political science;” see meta- + politics. Related: metapolitical, attested from 1670s in sense “outside the realm of politics.”metastasis (n.)Look up metastasis at Dictionary.com1570s, originally in rhetoric, from Late Latin metastasis “transition,” from Greek metastasis “a removing, removal; migration; a changing; change, revolution,” from methistanai “to remove, change,” from meta- “over, across” (see meta-) + histanai “to place, cause to stand,” from PIE root *sta- “to stand” (see stet). A rhetorical term in Late Latin for “a sudden transition in subjects,” medical use for “shift of disease from one part of the body to another” dates from 1660s in English. Related: Metastatic.metastasise (v.)Look up metastasise at Dictionary.comchiefly British English spelling of metastasize. Related: Metastasised; metastasising.metastasizeLook up metastasize at Dictionary.com1826, from metastasis + -ize. Related: Metastasized; metastasizing.metatarsal (adj.)Look up metatarsal at Dictionary.com1739, from metatarsus (1670s), from Modern Latin metatarsus, from meta- (see meta-) + tarsus (see tarsus). As a noun from 1854.metathesis (n.)Look up metathesis at Dictionary.com1570s, “transposition of letters in a word;” c. 1600, “rhetorical transposition of words,” from Late Latin metathesis, from Greek metathesis“change of position, transposition, change of opinion,” from stem of metatithenai “to transpose,” from meta- “to change” (see meta-) +tithenai “to place, set” (see theme). Plural is metatheses. Related: Metathetic.metathesize (v.)Look up metathesize at Dictionary.com1893, from metathesis + -ize. Related: Metathesized; metathesizing.mete (v.)Look up mete at Dictionary.com“to allot,” Old English metan “to measure, mete out; compare, estimate” (class V strong verb; past tense mæt, past participle meten), from Proto-Germanic *metan (cognates: Old Saxon metan, Old Frisian, Old Norse meta, Dutch meten, Old High German mezzan, German messen, Gothic mitan “to measure”), from PIE *med- “to take appropriate measures” (see medical). Used now only with out. Related: Meted; meting.mete (n.)Look up mete at Dictionary.com“boundary,” now only in phrase metes and bounds, late 15c., from Old French mete “limit, bounds, frontier,” from Latin meta “goal, boundary, post, pillar.”metempsychosis (n.)Look up metempsychosis at Dictionary.com1580s, “passing of the soul at death into another body,” from Late Latin metempsychosis, from Greek metempsychosis, from meta “change” (see meta-) + empsykhoun “to put a soul into,” from en “in” + psyche “soul” (see psyche). Pythagorean word for transmigration of souls at death. Related: Metempsychose (v.), 1590s.meteor (n.)Look up meteor at Dictionary.comlate 15c., “any atmospheric phenomenon,” from Middle French meteore (13c.) and directly from Medieval Latin meteorum (nominativemeteora), from Greek ta meteora “the celestial phenomena, things in heaven above,” plural of meteoron, literally “thing high up,” noun use of neuter of meteoros (adj.) “high up, raised from the ground, hanging,” from meta- “over, beyond” (see meta-) + -aoros “lifted, hovering in air,” related to aeirein “to raise” (see aorta).

Specific sense of “fireball, shooting star” is attested from 1590s. Atmospheric phenomena were formerly classified as aerial meteors (wind),aqueous meteors (rain, snow, hail), luminous meteors (aurora, rainbows), and igneous meteors (lightning, shooting stars).meteoric (adj.)Look up meteoric at Dictionary.com1812, “pertaining to meteors;” earlier “dependent on atmospheric conditions” (1789), from meteor + -ic. Figurative sense of “transiently brilliant” is from 1836.meteorite (n.)Look up meteorite at Dictionary.com“rock that falls to earth, after streaking across the sky as a meteor,” 1818, from meteor + -ite.meteoroid (n.)Look up meteoroid at Dictionary.com“rock floating in space, which becomes a meteor when it enters Earth’s atmosphere,” formed in English, 1865, from meteor + -oid.meteorological (adj.)Look up meteorological at Dictionary.com1560s, from Middle French météorologique or Greek meteorologikos; see meteorology + -ical. Related: Meteorologically.meteorologist (n.)Look up meteorologist at Dictionary.com1620s, from meteorology + -ist. Earlier was meteorologician (1570s). Greek meteorologos meant “one who deals with celestial phenomena, astronomer.”meteorology (n.)Look up meteorology at Dictionary.com“science of the atmosphere, weather forecasting,” 1610s, from French météorologie and directly from Greek meteorologia “treatise on celestial phenomena, discussion of high things,” from meteoron, literally “thing high up” (see meteor), + -logia “treatment of” (see -logy).meter (n.1)Look up meter at Dictionary.comalso metre, “poetic measure,” Old English meter “meter, versification,” from Latin metrum, from Greek metron “meter, a verse; that by which anything is measured; measure, length, size, limit, proportion,” from PIE root *me- (2) “to measure” (see meter (n.2)). Possibly reborrowed early 14c. (after a 300-year gap in recorded use) from Old French metre, with specific sense of “metrical scheme in verse,” from Latin metrum.meter (n.2)Look up meter at Dictionary.comalso metre, unit of length, 1797, from French mètre (18c.), from Greek metron “measure,” from PIE root *me- (2) “to measure” (cognates: Greek metra “lot, portion,” Sanskrit mati “measures,” matra “measure,” Avestan, Old Persian ma-, Latin metri “to measure”). Developed by French Academy of Sciences for system of weights and measures based on a decimal system originated 1670 by French clergyman Gabriel Mouton. Originally intended to be one ten-millionth of the length of a quadrant of the meridian.meter (n.3)Look up meter at Dictionary.com“device for measuring,” abstracted 1832 from gas-meter, etc., from French -mètre, used in combinations (in English from 1790), from Latinmetrum “measure” or cognate Greek metron “measure” (see meter (n.2)). Influenced by English meter “person who measures” (late 14c., agent noun from mete (v.)). As short for parking meter from 1960. Meter maid first recorded 1957; meter reader 1963.meter (v.)Look up meter at Dictionary.com“to measure by means of a meter,” 1884, from meter (n.3). Meaning “install parking meters” is from 1957.meth (n.)Look up meth at Dictionary.comcolloquial abbreviation of methedrine, attested from 1967.methadone (n.)Look up methadone at Dictionary.com1947, generic designation for 6-dimethylamino-4, 4-diphenyl-3-heptanone. For origins of the syllables, see methyl + amino + di- + -one.methamphetamine (n.)Look up methamphetamine at Dictionary.com1949, from methyl + amphetamine; so called because it was a methyl derivative of amphetamine.

OH HECK WITH IT…I’M TIRED OF UNDERLINING AND HIGHLIGHTING!
IF YOU DON’T UNDERSTAND BY KNOW WHAT IS RIGHT IN FRONT OF YOU – PLEASE JUST GIVE UP AND WAIT ON THE LORD TO SHOW YOU ONCE YOU ARE IN HEAVEN.
BUT…
PLEASE…PLEASE…PLEASE…
OPEN YOUR EYES TO WHAT I HAVE BEEN SHARING WITH YOU!!
1 Peter 5-7 Cast Your Cares on Him
5You younger men, likewise, be subject to your elders; and all of you, clothe yourselves with humility toward one another, for GOD IS OPPOSED TO THE PROUD, BUT GIVES GRACE TO THE HUMBLE. 6Therefore humble yourselves under the mighty hand of God, that He may exalt you at the proper time,7casting all your anxiety on Him, because He cares for you.…
Matthew 18:7-9 Temptations and Trespasses
7“Woe to the world because of its stumbling blocks! For it is inevitable that stumbling blocks come; but woe to that man through whom the stumbling block comes! 8“If your hand or your foot causes you to stumble, cut it off and throw it from you; it is better for you to enter life crippled or lame, than to have two hands or two feet and be cast into the eternal fire. 9“If your eye causes you to stumble, pluck it out and throw it from you. It is better for you to enter life with one eye, than to have two eyes and be cast into the fiery hell.

Matthew 5:30  21st Century King James Version (KJ21)

30 And if thy right hand cause thee to fall, cut it off and cast it from thee; for it is profitable for thee that one of thy members should perish, and not that thy whole body should be cast into hell.

Matthew 5:30  English Standard Version (ESV)

30 And if your right hand causes you to sin, cut it off and throw it away. For it is better that you lose one of your members than that your whole body go into hell.

Mark 9:42-50  English Standard Version (ESV)

Temptations to Sin

42 “Whoever causes one of these little ones who believe in me to sin,[a] it would be better for him if a great millstone were hung around his neck and he were thrown into the sea. 43 And if your hand causes you to sin, cut it off. It is better for you to enter life crippled than with two hands to go to hell,[b] to the unquenchable fire.[c] 45 And if your foot causes you to sin, cut it off. It is better for you to enter life lame than with two feet to be thrown into hell. 47 And if your eye causes you to sin, tear it out. It is better for you to enter the kingdom of God with one eye than with two eyes to be thrown into hell, 48 ‘where their worm does not die and the fire is not quenched.’ 49 For everyone will be salted with fire.[d] 50 Salt is good, but if the salt has lost its saltiness, how will you make it salty again? Have salt in yourselves, and be at peace with one another.”

Above are a few different chapters and verses regarding the importance of “casting away” or “cutting off” the hands and the feet that are causing you to sin – many specify the “right” hand or foot.  Why?  This is the side we relate to the “Righteous” or the “Good” side as Jesus sits on the right-hand of God the Father in Heaven.  What He is saying is that IF your righteousness, your congregation, teaching, teachers, leaders, or your “righteous knowledge of the Kingdom of Heaven” or the Word of God as interpreted is causing you to be wrong, ignorant, judgmental and is leading you astray to stagnant belief, GET IT OUT OF YOUR LIFE; throw it out, walk away from that – that is misleading and misguiding you and has you standing in pure blindness, along with causing one to become deaf!  Cut if off does not mean literally chop it off but to spiritually, mentally and physically remove that which causes error from yourself.  He would rather you start with nothing or at the beginning, being crippled in Him or what you know of Him as He can “work with that” or “heal” one of these afflictions but not when the beam in their own eye is so large is causes chronic blindness.  IT’S THE BONES!  IT’S THE BONES IN THE LEFT HAND AND FOOT, ALONG WITH THE BONES IN THE RIGHT HAND AND FOOT AS THESE ARE OUR TEACHERS – THESE WE ARE BORN WITH, THEY ARE PART OF US AND THEY REPRESENT BOTH SIDES!!  This is why it made a difference as to where the nails/stakes were driven into Jesus’s hands and feet.  These are our TEACHERS!  We can listen or be led by one side or the other; or, walk in the center of both, toggling back and forth, back and forth which is a form of being “lukewarm”; or, we can be led by the left side or the right side, each representing “being either hot or cold”!
Isaiah 52:7
7How lovely on the mountains Are the feet of him who brings good news, Who announces peace And brings good news of happiness, Who announces salvation, And says to Zion, “Your God reigns!”
10The LORD has bared His holy arm In the sight of all the nations, That all the ends of the earth may see The salvation of our God.

The Servant ExaltedAlso see – (Philippians 2:5-11)

Isaiah 52: 13 – 13See, my servant will act wisely; he will be raised and lifted up and highly exalted.  14Just as there were many who were appalled at him — his appearance was so disfigured beyond that of any human being and his form marred beyond human likeness–15 so he will sprinkle many nations, and kings will shut their mouths because of him. For what they were not told, they will see, and what they have not heard, they will understand.

Just curious here – but who do you think this is in Isaiah 52:13-15?  It’s a “servant” of God that resembles nothing of a man or a human being.  Yet, it tells us here that he will be raised up and highly exalted.

Above when it speaks of the Lord “baring His holy arm in the sight of all nations” – again, WHO is His HOLY ARM that He will bare for the whole world to see or all the NATIONS to see?  It is NOT who we think it is…but first, remember how many BONES are in His arm – there are 3 for a total of 6 for both arms.  Remember we are born with 270 bones but by the time we reach approx. 30 years of age (same age we are in Heaven), many have fused together leaving us with a total of 206…Six that are the part of the Holy Arm of God and 200 others that are under them.

Romans 10:15 (CEB) And how can they preach unless they are sent? As it is written, How beautiful are the feet of those who announce the good news.

Here’s another revelation…

As we reference another verse regarding the “beautiful feet of those that spread the Good News”, did you notice that it is with the “foot” Jesus states the head of the serpent will be crushed?  It’s with the foot or feet that the Word of God shall be spread and it’s in the Palm of His Hand that  we sit or rest and also that He covers us under (yes, also with His wings of an eagle).  Is the Old Testament the “Hands” while the New Testament the “Feet”?  Is this why we read the Bible from “left to right” while the Jews read the Torah from “right to left”?  Is it that those of the Old Testament were of God, and went from righteousness (the right) to unrighteousness (the left)?  Did they once sit on the Right Side of God’s Throne only to defile themselves where they then found themselves on the Left Side?  Was it then, while we – Man, on the other-hand, went from being defiled, being the actual “unclean” of the Bible, originating from the Left Side  –  that we end up on the Right Side because of our beautiful feet (New Testament) which crushes the head of the serpent, causing us now to be made “clean”?    Again…our Feet and Hands are God’s Army as they (the Bones) represent His Holy Structure – they are Israel & Judah, the armies of each.  One side are the Shepherd’s of the Flocks and the other side, their brothers, are the Shepherd’s of the Ground/Earth.  They are the Mighty Hand of God in the Old Testament that “struck down Job” leaving him to be threshed in the dust/dirt of the ground, and they are the Beautiful Feet of the New Testament that carried the Good News of Salvation that would reconcile ALL OF WORLD back to God.  These are the Two Witnesses of God.  These 2 groups have the power of God to strike down any who come against them; these 2 groups will be trampled in Jerusalem in the days to come as it is a Heavenly Battle led by Jesus.  These are the 7 angels that are all IN the Lord, of the Lord and their armies under them.  These are the Dry Bones as they are also “bone of my bone”.  This is why, again, no bones could be broken as stated as such in the prophecies of our Savior, Jesus Christ.

All things are from God and this time is no different.  It is from the Bones of Christ that the Beast will come – this is why it states that he is the 8th but came from the 7 before.  This is how the Jews will see their Messiah – because the Jews He is speaking about are not the Children of God and this Messiah that Jesus will show them is far different from ours…from the Messiah/Savior we believe in with the Beautiful Feet.  This Messiah will use His hands and not His feet.  Is this how the “abomination that causes the desolation” stands in the Holy Place, the Holy Temple as he will now be standing in Jesus, the true Holy of Holies?

I will finish this tomorrow so consider this Part 1 of ??  PLEASE GO TO MY YOU TUBE CHANNEL TO SEE THE LAST 3 VIDEO UPLOADS THAT WERE POSTED WITHIN THE LAST 2 DAYS…I WILL NOT POST THEM HERE UNTIL TOMORROW EVENING.

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